@techreport{TD:100490,
	att_abstract={{The Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) was designed as a protocol to establish multimedia over IP sessions between endpoints. Several protocol elements have been introduced to support common features such as call redirection and transfer performed at the endpoints. At the same time, real-world deployments have shown that intermediaries are commonly deployed in the network to provide advanced features.  Conflicts between these protocol elements and intermediary application servers may lead to failure of operations and undesirable feature interactions.  This paper examines the problems and proposes a general solution suite which includes suggested handling of these protocol elements and feature interaction management.  The benefits include smooth interoperability of endpoint protocol elements and network-resident applications, and desirable overall service behavior.}},
	att_authors={ec1916, ts2732},
	att_categories={C_NSS.6},
	att_copyright={{ACM}},
	att_copyright_notice={{(c) ACM, 2011. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in  Principles, Systems and Applications of IP Telecommunications {{, 2011-08-01}}.
}},
	att_donotupload={},
	att_private={false},
	att_projects={E4SS, IPTelecomServices},
	att_tags={},
	att_techdoc={true},
	att_techdoc_key={TD:100490},
	att_url={http://web1.research.att.com:81/techdocs_downloads/TD:100490_DS1_2011-06-17T12:36:46.158Z.pdf},
	author={Eric Cheung and Thomas Smith},
	institution={{Principles, Systems and Applications of IP Telecommunications}},
	month={August},
	title={{Getting SIP Endpoints and Network Call Control to Work Well Together}},
	year=2011,
}